Study shows a robust relationship between frequency of yoga practice and psychological wellness in older women.

 

I just wanted to let you know about a compelling study, Yoga experience as a predictor of psychological wellness in women over 45 years, in the International Journal of Yoga. It showed a robust relationship between frequency of yoga practice and psychological wellness in older women.

Their conclusion was that there was a “dose-response” effect for yoga. Meaning that the more “doses” of yoga a woman had over her lifetime, the higher she scored on levels of psychological well-being. Higher numbers of total hours of yoga practiced over a lifetime were “strongly associated” with higher levels of psychological well-being.

The study showed that both regular and frequent yoga practice that was the “most consistent predictor” of psychological wellness.

When the authors looked at “positive psychological attitudes” for the survey they defined it as “serenity under pressure, interest and satisfaction in life, a sense of purpose, contentment with self and life, meaning in one's work, low levels of worry and anxiety, a sense of self-worth, hope, and self-confidence.”

The findings showed that the more you practice yoga over your lifetime the more psychological well-being you would experience. However, when they just measured “yoga experience” as a number of years of practice without taking into account the actual number of hours of practice, they did not see the same "dose-response" effect. It was both regular and frequent yoga practice that was the “most consistent predictor” of psychological wellness.

According to the authors “enduring well-being” is not the result of certain things happening to you, but instead, that long-term wellness can be “developed and cultivated with time and effort” regardless of specific events in your life.

When the authors looked at “positive psychological attitudes” for the survey they defined it as “serenity under pressure, interest and satisfaction in life, a sense of purpose, contentment with self and life, meaning in one's work, low levels of worry and anxiety, a sense of self-worth, hope, and self-confidence.”

The findings showed that the more you practice yoga over your lifetime the more psychological well-being you would experience. However, when they just measured “yoga experience” as a number of years of practice without taking into account the actual number of hours of practice, they did not see the same "dose-response" effect. It was both regular and frequent yoga practice that was the “most consistent predictor” of psychological wellness.

Sierra Wagner